Artist of the Month

 Time to Shine! The Center for Performing Arts  4375 Woodbine Road, Pace, Florida 32571  850.994.5678  info@timetoshineflorida.com

>George Balanchine, choreographer

Born: January 22, 1904 Died: April 30, 1983 George Balanchine is regarded as the foremost contemporary choreographer in the world of ballet. He came to the United States in late 1933 following an early career throughout Europe. The son of a composer, Balanchine early in life gained a knowledge of music that far exceeds that of most of his fellow choreographers. He began studying the piano at the age of five and following his graduation in 1921 from the Imperial Ballet School, he enrolled in the state's Conservatory of Music, where he studied piano and musical theory, including composition, harmony and counterpoint, for three years. Such extensive musical training made it possible for Balanchine as a choreographer to communicate with a composer of such stature as Igor Stravinsky; the training also gave Balanchine the ability to reduce orchestral scores on the piano, an invaluable aid in translating music into dance. Balanchine made his own dancing debut at the age of 10 as a cupid in the Maryinsky Theatre Ballet Company production of The Sleeping Beauty. He joined the company as a member of the corps de ballet at 17. Most of his energies during this period, however, were concentrated on choreographic experiments outside the company. Boston-born dance connoisseur Lincoln Kirstein harbored a dream: He wanted to establish an American school of ballet that would equal European schools, and he wanted to establish an American ballet company. Kirstein met Balanchine and saw in him the means by which this dream could be realized, if only the choreographer could be persuaded to relocate to the United States. Balanchine agreed to come to America that very year, and the first product of the Balanchine- Kirstein collaboration was the School of American Ballet, founded in 1934. The School remains in operation to this day, training students for the New York City Ballet and companies throughout the United States and the world. The first ballet Balanchine choreographed in this country—Serenade to music by Tchaikovsky—was created as a workshop for students at the School and had its world premiere outdoors on the estate of a friend near White Plains, New York. In 1946, Balanchine and Kirstein collaborated again to form Ballet Society, a company which introduced New York subscription-only audiences over the next two years to such new works as The Four Temperaments (1946) and Stravinsky's Renard (1947) and Orpheus (1948). Morton Baum, chairman of the City Center finance committee, saw Ballet Society and was so highly impressed that he initiated negotiations that led to the company's being invited to join the City Center municipal complex as the "New York City Ballet." Balanchine's talents at last had found a permanent home. On October 11, 1948, the New York City Ballet was born, dancing a program consisting of Concerto Barocco, Orpheus and Symphony In C. From that time until his death, Balanchine served as artistic director for the New York City Ballet, choreographing (either wholly or in part) the majority of the productions the company has introduced since its inception. In 1970 U.S. News & World Report attempted to summarize Balanchine's achievements in the following words: The greatest choreographer of our time, George Balanchine, is responsible for the successful fusion of modern concepts with older ideas of classical ballet. Balanchine received his training in Imperial Russia before coming to America in 1933. Here, the free-flowing U.S. dance forms stimulated him to develop new techniques in dance design and presentation which have altered the thinking of the world of dance. Often working with modern music, and the simplest of themes, he has created ballets that are celebrated for their imagination and originality. His company, the New York City Ballet, is the leading dance group of the United States and one of the greatest companies in the world. An essential part of the success of Balanchine's group has been the training of his dancers, which he has supervised since the founding of his School of American Ballet in 1934. Balanchine chose to shape talent locally, and he has said that the basic structure of the American dancer was responsible for inspiring some of the striking lines of his composition. Balanchine is not only gifted in creating entirely new productions—his choreography for classical works has been equally—fresh and inventive. He has made American dance the most advanced and richest in choreographic development in the world today. Source—http://www.nycballet.com/explore/our-history/george-balanchine.aspx

Artist of the Month

>George Balanchine, choreographer

 Time to Shine! The Center for Performing Arts  4375 Woodbine Road, Pace, Florida 32571  850.994.5678  info@timetoshineflorida.com
Born: January 22, 1904 Died: April 30, 1983 George Balanchine is regarded as the foremost contemporary choreographer in the world of ballet. He came to the United States in late 1933 following an early career throughout Europe. The son of a composer, Balanchine early in life gained a knowledge of music that far exceeds that of most of his fellow choreographers. He began studying the piano at the age of five and following his graduation in 1921 from the Imperial Ballet School, he enrolled in the state's Conservatory of Music, where he studied piano and musical theory, including composition, harmony and counterpoint, for three years. Such extensive musical training made it possible for Balanchine as a choreographer to communicate with a composer of such stature as Igor Stravinsky; the training also gave Balanchine the ability to reduce orchestral scores on the piano, an invaluable aid in translating music into dance. Balanchine made his own dancing debut at the age of 10 as a cupid in the Maryinsky Theatre Ballet Company production of The Sleeping Beauty. He joined the company as a member of the corps de ballet at 17. Most of his energies during this period, however, were concentrated on choreographic experiments outside the company. Boston-born dance connoisseur Lincoln Kirstein harbored a dream: He wanted to establish an American school of ballet that would equal European schools, and he wanted to establish an American ballet company. Kirstein met Balanchine and saw in him the means by which this dream could be realized, if only the choreographer could be persuaded to relocate to the United States. Balanchine agreed to come to America that very year, and the first product of the Balanchine-Kirstein collaboration was the School of American Ballet, founded in 1934. The School remains in operation to this day, training students for the New York City Ballet and companies throughout the United States and the world. The first ballet Balanchine choreographed in this country—Serenade to music by Tchaikovsky—was created as a workshop for students at the School and had its world premiere outdoors on the estate of a friend near White Plains, New York. In 1946, Balanchine and Kirstein collaborated again to form Ballet Society, a company which introduced New York subscription-only audiences over the next two years to such new works as The Four Temperaments (1946) and Stravinsky's Renard (1947) and Orpheus (1948). Morton Baum, chairman of the City Center finance committee, saw Ballet Society and was so highly impressed that he initiated negotiations that led to the company's being invited to join the City Center municipal complex as the "New York City Ballet." Balanchine's talents at last had found a permanent home. On October 11, 1948, the New York City Ballet was born, dancing a program consisting of Concerto Barocco, Orpheus and Symphony In C. From that time until his death, Balanchine served as artistic director for the New York City Ballet, choreographing (either wholly or in part) the majority of the productions the company has introduced since its inception. In 1970 U.S. News & World Report attempted to summarize Balanchine's achievements in the following words: The greatest choreographer of our time, George Balanchine, is responsible for the successful fusion of modern concepts with older ideas of classical ballet. Balanchine received his training in Imperial Russia before coming to America in 1933. Here, the free- flowing U.S. dance forms stimulated him to develop new techniques in dance design and presentation which have altered the thinking of the world of dance. Often working with modern music, and the simplest of themes, he has created ballets that are celebrated for their imagination and originality. His company, the New York City Ballet, is the leading dance group of the United States and one of the greatest companies in the world. An essential part of the success of Balanchine's group has been the training of his dancers, which he has supervised since the founding of his School of American Ballet in 1934. Balanchine chose to shape talent locally, and he has said that the basic structure of the American dancer was responsible for inspiring some of the striking lines of his composition. Balanchine is not only gifted in creating entirely new productions—his choreography for classical works has been equally—fresh and inventive. He has made American dance the most advanced and richest in choreographic development in the world today. Source—http://www.nycballet.com/explore/our-history/george- balanchine.aspx