Artist of the Month

 Time to Shine! The Center for Performing Arts  4375 Woodbine Road, Pace, Florida 32571  850.994.5678  info@timetoshineflorida.com

>Aaron Copland, composer

Born: November 14, 1900 Died: December 2, 1990 Aaron Copland was an influential and prolific American composer. His music personifies the sound of American music, evoking the vast American landscape, iconic themes and pioneer spirit. Early Life Aaron Copland was born on November 14, 1900, in Brooklyn, New York to parents of Jewish and Eastern European descent. The youngest of five children, Copland went on to develop an interest in the piano. He later studied under Rubin Goldmark in Manhattan and regularly attended classical music performances. At 20 years old Copland opted to continue his studies in Fontainebleau, France, where he received tutelage from the famed Nadia Boulanger. Influences Copland’s earliest musical inclinations as a teenager ran toward Chopin, Debussy, Verdi and the Russian composers. Some of his preferences might also have been formed by the anti-German feelings during World War I, as later he studied German music. Copland’s teacher and mentor Nadia Boulanger was his most important influence. Following her model, he studied all periods of classical music and all forms—from madrigals to symphonies. This breadth of vision led Copland to compose music for numerous settings—orchestra, opera, solo piano, small ensemble, art song, ballet, theater and film. Above all others, Copland named Igor Stravinsky as his “hero” and his favorite 20th- century composer. Stravinsky was in many ways his premiere model. Stravinsky’s rhythm and vitality is apparent in many of his works. Copland especially admired Stravinsky’s “jagged and uncouth rhythmic effects,” “bold use of dissonance,” and “hard, dry, crackling sonority. Another inspiration for much of Copland’s music was jazz. Copland believed that the essence of jazz was rooted in rhythm. Copland identified any sort of syncopation as metrical phenomenon. By the 1950s, Copland had come to see the possibilities of jazz less and less in his compositions, though the idea of syncopated rhythm would continue to feature prominently in many of his works. Later Life & Legacy From the 1960s onward, Copland’s activities turned more from composing to conducting. Though not enamored with the prospect, he found himself without new ideas for composition, saying: “It was exactly as if someone had simply turned off a faucet.” Copland was a frequent guest conductor of orchestras in the U.S. and the UK. He made a series of recordings of his music, primarily for Columbia Records. Often referred to as “the Dean of American Composers,” he is best known to the public for the works he wrote in the 1930s and 1940s in a deliberately accessible style. These works include the ballets Appalachian Spring, Billy the Kid and Rodeo, his Fanfare for the Common Man and Third Symphony. In addition to his ballets and orchestral works, he produced music in many other genres including chamber music, vocal works, opera and film scores. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Copland https://www.biography.com/musician/aaron-copland

Artist of the Month

>Aaron Copland, composer

 Time to Shine! The Center for Performing Arts  4375 Woodbine Road, Pace, Florida 32571  850.994.5678  info@timetoshineflorida.com
Born: November 14, 1900 Died: December 2, 1990 Aaron Copland was an influential and prolific American composer. His music personifies the sound of American music, evoking the vast American landscape, iconic themes and pioneer spirit. Early Life Aaron Copland was born on November 14, 1900, in Brooklyn, New York to parents of Jewish and Eastern European descent. The youngest of five children, Copland went on to develop an interest in the piano. He later studied under Rubin Goldmark in Manhattan and regularly attended classical music performances. At 20 years old Copland opted to continue his studies in Fontainebleau, France, where he received tutelage from the famed Nadia Boulanger. Influences Copland’s earliest musical inclinations as a teenager ran toward Chopin, Debussy, Verdi and the Russian composers. Some of his preferences might also have been formed by the anti-German feelings during World War I, as later he studied German music. Copland’s teacher and mentor Nadia Boulanger was his most important influence. Following her model, he studied all periods of classical music and all forms—from madrigals to symphonies. This breadth of vision led Copland to compose music for numerous settings—orchestra, opera, solo piano, small ensemble, art song, ballet, theater and film. Above all others, Copland named Igor Stravinsky as his “hero” and his favorite 20th-century composer. Stravinsky was in many ways his premiere model. Stravinsky’s rhythm and vitality is apparent in many of his works. Copland especially admired Stravinsky’s “jagged and uncouth rhythmic effects,” “bold use of dissonance,” and “hard, dry, crackling sonority. Another inspiration for much of Copland’s music was jazz. Copland believed that the essence of jazz was rooted in rhythm. Copland identified any sort of syncopation as metrical phenomenon. By the 1950s, Copland had come to see the possibilities of jazz less and less in his compositions, though the idea of syncopated rhythm would continue to feature prominently in many of his works. Later Life & Legacy From the 1960s onward, Copland’s activities turned more from composing to conducting. Though not enamored with the prospect, he found himself without new ideas for composition, saying: “It was exactly as if someone had simply turned off a faucet.” Copland was a frequent guest conductor of orchestras in the U.S. and the UK. He made a series of recordings of his music, primarily for Columbia Records. Often referred to as “the Dean of American Composers,” he is best known to the public for the works he wrote in the 1930s and 1940s in a deliberately accessible style. These works include the ballets Appalachian Spring, Billy the Kid and Rodeo, his Fanfare for the Common Man and Third Symphony. In addition to his ballets and orchestral works, he produced music in many other genres including chamber music, vocal works, opera and film scores. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Copland https://www.biography.com/musician/aaron-copland